Emma cria lista de reprodução no Spotify sobre racismo

Durante os últimos dias, a Emma esteve a preparar uma lista de reprodução no Spotify com diversos conteúdos sobre racismo para aqueles que querem aprender mais sobre o assunto e como podem ajudar.

Os dois primeiros conteúdos são a entrevista com a Reni Eddo-Lodge que a Emma realizou para o clube Our Shared Shelf e a leitura de um capítulo da escritora gravada pela Emma.

Oiçam e partilhem a lista de reprodução aqui.

Na semana passada, para tornar mais fácil para que outros possam aceder aos tantos recursos úteis que existem, comecei uma lista de reprodução no @Spotify com podcasts, textos, análises e dicussão que me têm ajudado a perceber o racismo sistémico, supremacia branca e as experiências de pessoas negras, indígenas e de cor.

Em primeiro lugar na lista de reprodução está uma entrevista com @renieddolodge sobre o seu livro ‘Why I am no longer talking to white people about race’ que fez parte do meu clube do livro @OurSharedShelf. Em segundo está uma leitura do capítulo “Histories” do livro dela. Eu mesma fiz a narrativa porque me tirou o fôlego quando o li pela primeira vez. Continha tanta história que nunca me ensinaram na escola. Espero que nenhuma outra geração de crianças tenha que crescer sem perceber o contexto histórico do racismo contemporâneo.⁣

Podem encontrar a minha lista de reprodução Our Shared Podcast no Spotify e espero que achem a minha coleção estimulante e que vos leve a pensar. […]

Muito obrigada às pessoas que partilharam recomendações para esta lista, e para todos os que trabalharam tanto durante os últimos 10 dias para ter isto em funcionamento, especialmente @renieddolodge, @bloomsburypublishing, @Audible, @Spotify, @anchor.fm e toda a minha equipa.

#blacklivesmatter #blackliberation #saytheirname #sayhername #sayhisname #racialjustice #blmmovement #blackauthors

Tradução por EmmaWatsonPortugal.Org

Abaixo deixamos alguns conteúdos que a Emma tem partilhado sobre este assunto.

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Self-education is an essential part of any anti-racist journey, and reading has always been a huge part of my personal learning. In 2016 I started @oursharedshelf, a bookclub to create conversations around intersectionality, feminism and equal rights and to profile feminist writers. Many of the writers and books we featured over the years are relevant to anyone wanting to understand that the struggle for racial justice has been a long one, that ALL Black Lives Matter and women’s voices are a vital part of any movement for change. Alice Walker, Bell Hooks, Maya Angelou, Roxane Gay, Reni Eddo-Lodge, Angie Thomas, Audre Lorde, Brittney Cooper, and Toni Morrison are just some of the authors we featured and which I urge you to check out if you haven’t already.⁣ ⁣ More recently, I have also been working through the following books. I hope you’ll pick these up and read along with me. See my IG stories for other book lists and resources. ⁣ ⁣ The Wretched of the Earth by Frantz Fanon⁣ We Were Eight Years in Power by Ta-Nehisi Coates⁣ Discourse on Colonialism by Aimé Césaire⁣ From #BlackLivesMatter to Black Liberation by Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor⁣ Black and British: A Forgotten History by David Olusoga⁣ Girl, Woman, Other by Bernadine Evaristo ⁣ Between the World and Me by Ta-Nehisi Coates⁣ White Privilege: The Myth of a Post-Racial Society by Kalwant Bhopal ⁣ I’m Telling the Truth by Basset Ikpi ⁣ The Heart of the Race. Black Women’s Lives in Britain by Beverly Bryan, Stella Dadzie, and Suzanne Scafe, Lola Okolosie (foreword)⁣ The Good Immigrant by Nikesh Shukla and others ⁣ ⁣ Painting by artist @natalielaurensims ⁣ #blacklivesmatter ⁣ #blackliberation ⁣ #saytheirname⁣ #sayhername⁣ #sayhisname⁣ #racialjustice ⁣ #blmmovement ⁣ #blackwriters

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One thing we can all do to honour the struggle for racial justice in the US is to interrogate, understand and dismantle the racist structures of our own countries. The UK is the country I was brought up in, the country that I vote in and a country whose own history of systemic racism has shaped those elsewhere – American and British histories of racial oppression are very much intertwined. But it wasn’t until I became a student in an American university and was taught British history from an outsider’s perspective that I really started to understand the racial violence that scars British history. As a child I grew up with a school curriculum that totally glossed over British colonialism and British slavery. And any teaching around black civil rights movements were focussed on the American experience – as @renieddolodge points out in her book, Black History Month in the UK often ends up offering British children timelines of American activists. For me, understanding our past is a crucial part of understanding the injustices and inequalities of our present and remaking our future as a nation. Our school education system is key – the stories the national curriculum tells us about who we are, and the voices it centres, create a blueprint for how we interpret and interact with the world around us. As an adult, I’ve benefited from the work of people like @renieddolodge, David Olusoga, @johnymodern, @afuahirsch @akalamusic, Paul Gilroy, Stuart Hall and many others to help me understand my country’s history. But this learning needs to start much, much earlier if we are to dismantle deep-rooted systems of oppression and injustice. Thank you to all the historians, teachers, activists and students who are paving the way for a truly anti-racist education system.⁣ ⁣ First image by @rmraffinity, The True Crown. This image is part of I Am Sugar (2018), a series of photographs that respond to Stuart Hall’s 1991 essay, Old and New Ethnicities, in which Hall writes, “I am the sugar in the bottom of the English cup of tea.” The work appeared as part of Get Up, Stand Up Now, @somersethouse in 2018.⁣ ⁣ Swipe for a guide brilliantly put together by @theblackcurriculum ⁣

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7/Jun/2020 Daniela Godinho 0 comentários

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